Oriental Pork with White Rice

This oriental dish is made with ground pork and is full of traditional flavors. Using oyster sauce and soy sauce, this dish is mostly savory with some sweet flavors. I added onion for an additional flavor. You could also add any other vegetables such as bok choy, peas, broccoli, Swiss chard, or radish. Best served with a side of rice, this dish is full of flavor and very filling. The recipe I made makes 5 adult sized meals.

  1. Place 1/2 pound ground pork into a large sauce pan, and heat over medium heat. Add 2 Tbsp oil. Brown pork and break it up. Add 1 small diced onion (1/2 cup), and cook till translucent.
  2. Add 1 Tbsp oyster sauce and 1 Tbsp soy sauce, cook till dark brown. Add 2 tsp garlic powder, 1 dash red pepper flakes, and 1 tsp ground ginger. Stir.
  3. Add 1 cup water. Simmer until most water is evaporated. Serve with white rice.

Oriental Pork Chops

These oriental pork chops are both sweet and savory. They are full of flavor and the flavor fully penetrates the pork. I used very thin pork chops only about 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. I cooked it fully first in the skillet, but the baking heated everything up together, allowed the pork to take the flavor, and allowed the sauce to mature in flavor as it cooked. This recipe is relatively sweet, so if you want it more savory, feel free to cut back on honey or swap out worcestershire for soy sauce and add your desired garlic flavor instead.

  1. Heat oven to 400 F, and begin heating a large skillet over medium high heat. Add 2 Tbsp of oil to the skillet.
  2. Rinse pork chops under low pressured cold water. Transfer your chops to the heated skillet, and cook chops in the pan for 4 minutes per side, or until they begin taking color.
  3. In a 8×8 baking dish, mix together 1 can (8 oz) of tomato sauce, 9 Tbsp of worcestershire sauce, 2 Tbsp honey, and 2 tsp of ground ginger. Transfer pork chops into baking dish, then coat and cover with sauce. Bake for 20 minutes.
  4. Make 1 cup of white rice and serve the pork chops with rice.

Pork and Sauerkraut

This is a dish I grew up having regularly. It’s so simple and easy. It can be made with less than 5 minutes active cooking time. I like to serve it with mashed potatoes and butter, because pork in butter has a similar flavor to steamed clams, which I love. It also has a more desirable texture then clams if you are grossed out by them. I’m also still feeling sick, so this dinner worked perfectly for us.

  1. Preheat oven to 450 F.
  2. Rinse your pork chops under slow running cold water, then place in a casserole dish. Open a can of sauerkraut and place around the pork in the dish.
  3. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes for thin pork chops. Cook until 170 F internal temperature, and add extra water to the pan as needed. Best served with mashed potatoes and butter.

Fried Pork Chops

I started frying pork chops this summer and it is my favorite way to cook pork! The crisp breading and the high heat makes the fat able to just melt in your mouth. I used a large dutch oven for my frying, and I used a pie plate to hold my flour. By adding extra herbs and ingredients to the flour you can add extra flavoring to the pork chops, but my best advice would be to serve them with a side that is very flavorful, or with a sauce or gravy that has a complimenting flavor.

  1. Place 1/2 cup of flour for every 4 pork chops in a shallow large dish.
  2. In a large and high sided pot/dutch oven, heat 2/3 cups of oil on medium high heat until rather hot.
  3. Rinse pork chops under very gentle cold water and transfer to small plate.
  4. Flip pork chops in the flour one at a time until the flour sticks to the whole surface and place gently down into oil.
  5. Cook each pork chop 2-3 minutes per side or until the crust turns golden.
  6. Let rest on paper towel lined plate for 3 minutes before serving.

Christmas Holiday Ham

I am a Ham Lover. We’ve had just about every type of ham you can get, and they always turn out well if they are cooked enough with a good glaze. When I was growing up, we always got a 5 lb canned ham. But over the years, even the price of canned ham has risen, which has led us to try spiral cut hams, pre-cooked & sliced hams without the bone, ham steaks, and we’ve even done a roast for Christmas! Ham is the tradition, and I personally never miss out on a holiday where I can have a nice ham.

I do like spiral cut hams, but it’s very important to cook them “low and slow” because you want the internal temp to come high enough to melt the internal fat. It is also important to remove it from the glaze once it’s finished cooking, because the fat will re-solidify and ruin your remaining ham if you don’t remove it from the fat and bone after you finish eating. Some people don’t like canned hams because they seem fake or overly processed, and though that is a good concern and it doesn’t look like real ham anymore, it also has less fat and tends to be an easier eat if you have bad teeth or want a meal that requires less chewing. Processed ham steaks are definitely less food than the other types. They also tend to be a mix in textures being mostly ham-like with it having pieces that seem less processed than canned hams. Each type of ham has a draw back to different people, however most of the problems arise in how the meat is prepped and cooked.

Though it seems old fashioned, I always go with the honey and brown sugar glaze even for my non-holiday hams. I find the sweetness to go so well with the savory aspect of the ham. But, for Christmas, we also top our ham with pineapple and cherries, so when we make up the glaze we also add a bit of acidity by adding some pineapple juice to the honey brown sugar. The acidity does really well to compliment the saltiness of ham. When we make our glaze, we usually do 1:2 Honey to brown sugar. When we make our Christmas ham, we usually go for 60% brown sugar, 30% honey, 2% cherry juice and 8% pineapple juice. You are looking for a consistency where the glaze is mostly solid and won’t run completely off the ham. If it is too liquidy, add more brown sugar and honey, and stir well.